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OUR CAUSES

 
 

WHAT WE'RE WORKING FOR

 
 

Late detection of ovarian cancer and childhood illiteracy have one thing in common: They are preventable.

That's where your donations come in.

 

Ovarian cancer is treatable and has a high survival rate, but only if it's caught early.

 
 

Ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women, despite being the 11th most common cancer in women. This is because early detection is key.

"If ovarian cancer is found (and treated) before the cancer has spread outside the ovary, the 5-year relative survival rate is 92%. However, only 15% of all ovarian cancers are found at this early stage."
American Cancer Society

Most women don't know that they are developing the cancer because the symptoms are so similar to many benign conditions.

 

The acronym BEAT can help remind you and your loved ones of ovarian cancer symptoms:

B – is for BLOATING it’s persistent and doesn’t come and go

E – is for EATING difficulty eating and feeling full more quickly

A – is for ABDOMINAL and pelvic pain you feel most days

T – is for TOILET  changes in urination or bowel habits

By supporting education initiatives and research, we can do our part to help women catch this disease early and get the help they need.

 

1 in 79

WOMEN WILL DEVELOP OVARIAN CANCER IN THEIR LIFETIME

5th

LEADING CAUSE OF CANCER-RELATED DEATHS IN WOMEN

 

22,240

NEW CASES EXPECTED TO BE DIAGNOSED IN 2018

14,070

ESTIMATED DEATHS DUE TO OVARIAN CANCER IN 2018

These stats from OCRFA

 
 
 

Access to books makes all the difference when it comes to children's ability to read.

 
 

In Chicago (Amy's home) and across the country, large percentages of children lack the education and exposure to books they need in order to develop strong reading skills.

Reading allows children to unlock their imaginations, learn new skills, and shape their lives on their terms.

26% of children who were read to three or four times in the last week by a family member recognized all letters of the alphabet. This is compared to 14% of children who were read to less frequently. —NEA

 

For a strong start in reading, kids both need books and time to read (and be read to).

In underserved communities experiencing poverty where parents work more jobs to make ends meet, there is less time spent to read together, and less money to purchase books.

The Amy Krouse Rosenthal Foundation works with organizations in Chicagoland and across the country who aim to put books in the hands of kids who need them most.

 
 

Be a part of the solution.

 
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